March 23rd 2016: Thought of the Day

quote-there-are-1-000-lessons-in-defeat-but-only-one-in-victory-confucius-82-90-32

One of my dear friends encouraged me to get the motivate chrome extension that displays a motivational and uplifting quote every time you open up a new tab. The quote above came up yesterday morning while I was doing some work. While I recognized the profound wisdom in Confucius’ statement, my ego bristled at it. Losing is for losers my ego continued. Only if I knew how I would be challenged later on that day.

I had recommenced training with the track team at UBC later that afternoon after a brief hiatus because of some troublesome achilles tendonitis. Something in my body felt a little bit off, but I ignored my inclination as I was feeling quite explosive and eager to return to action.

We were practicing our run throughs for a competition this weekend. I was blazing down the runway doing the last run through of my jumps for the day when calamity struck. The moment every track athlete feared occurred. Just as I had taken off for my jump, I felt a searing pain simultaneously with a huge “muscle cramp”. Having hurt this hamstring before, I knew this was a severe injury.

TRINIDAD'S BOLDON HOLDS HIS LEG AFTER THE 200M FINAL IN SYDNEY

No one is immune to injuries. However, some of us bounce back stronger and more resilient.

Even though I was extremely disappointed and angry, a tiny voice calmed me down and quipped, “they are no failures or negative events, just learning opportunities”. They were a lot of glaring physical and mental weaknesses that I was ignoring because of the wonderful progress I was making in my training. I needed this to occur to focus my attention on them so I could rebound a stronger and better athlete and human being.

Before I could conduct a thorough investigation of my injury, I needed to become aware, accept, and then let go of the emotions that were coming up after my injury. It is essential to realize that any so called negative emotions that arise from a certain event/situation is NEVER caused by that situation. Life brings out these suppressed dark elements of ourselves to the light so that we can transmute them into something beautiful. 

There are no bad or negative emotions. Emotions only become negative when they become bottle up and submerged. The key is to let it flow and then let it go. For example, do not suppress your emotions of anger because it is not socially acceptable to be angry. Instead, revel in the anger, pay attention to how your body feels when you’re angry, and then and only then can you make the enlightened decision to drop the emotion. An important corollary is that just because you are feeling an intense emotion, you are not compelled to blindly have your actions follow that emotion. It is human to feel angry, but it is wrong to commit violence when angry. 

Dealing with the emotions that arise due to an injury is just as important as anything physical you do to ameliorate the injury. Just like you can get scar tissue lodged in your muscle and joints after an injury, you can get emotions, such as anger and fear, lodged into your psyche. This lodged emotion will hamper your performance just as much as scar tissue.

How do you deal with these emotions? Two tools that I have found helpful when these emotions arise are:

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One of the most therapeutic and effective tools I have used when dealing with with tough times.

  1. Journaling – There is something truly remarkable about spilling the contents of your mind onto a blank piece of paper. The key is to place NO filter or judgement on what comes out. People who say they have nothing to write about are just unconscious about how much they judge and limit themselves. Lastly, it is essential that you physically write in cursive with a pen and paper. There is an intimate connection with the hand and brain that you need to take advantage of to be the best that you can be.
  2. Body Meditation – Many times physical pain experienced in the body is a deeply lodged emotion’s last cry to become noticed. It is no coincidence that disease has the words “dis- ease.” Disease can not occur in a body in a state of ease and non-resistance. This meditation can be done anywhere at anytime you have a spare moment. Become aware of your body. How fast is your heart beating? What does it sound like? What is the rhythm of your beats? Are you at ease? Is there tension in your body? Get curious about your body and revel in all of its sensations. For the vast majority of people, they experience reality all in their head. Remind yourself that you have a miraculous body attached to your head.

Losing and/or getting injured just plain sucks. There are no qualms about that. Sometimes I wonder if the ruthless mentality of professional sports and NCAA athletics, which unfortunately is seeping its way into youth sports, needs to be revolutionized. A maniacal obsession with winning and being superior to others should NOT be seen as a positive trait. The pursuit of self actualization and personal excellence are, but beating others is definitely not!

Even though there are many pitfalls with this culture, there is one major positive aspect lurking in the background. Elite athletics is such a ruthless world that every athlete will experience their fair share of losing, heartbreaks, and injuries.

This is an amazing opportunity that provides the impetus for all of us to not only be a better athlete but also a better human being. I hope this post gave you a fresh new perspective to help deal with defeats, disappointments, and injuries that are integral parts of athletics and just life in general. If you are going through an injury now and this has helped you, please share your experience below. It will not only warm my heart, but hearing someone’s experiences could be exactly what someone needs to be the strongest version of themselves. Lastly, if you have any other tools you use to deal with tough injuries and loses, please share it with everyone. Let’s create a community of leaders who are adamant about achieving their full potential and serving the world. 

Personal Excellence and Service, 

Pavan Mehat

PS Here are a couple of ways to connect with me if you have any questions or have any specific topics you would like me to address.

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August 25th 2015: Thought of the Day

This is an unconventional thought of the day, but after I saw this video I had to share it. I have realized that the information and messages I feed my brain, is what my subconscious believes and embodies. So every morning after I do my morning ritual, and my workout, I make sure to watch an uplifting video or two. This one showed up on my recommended list on YouTube.

This video resonated with me so much because it had reinforced so much of what I have been sharing previously. Everyone can live the life of their dreams. You may be thinking, but wouldn’t all the good things run out if everyone lived their dream life? Doesn’t there have to be someone on the bottom and someone on the top? Absolutely NOT. We are all unique, and have different passions and inclinations. Therefore we want different things. As Denzel emphasized in the video if we have a desire to achieve something that will improve this world, then we already have the power to achieve it.

Yet it is NOT guaranteed to occur and requires an intense amount of hard work. Discipline and consistency are the keys to turn your dreams into reality. There is nothing that can not be conquered by daily right actions. However, what or how much you achieve personally is not what truly matters. Anything external is fleeting. What matters is how you affect other people. Did you make this world a better place?

So how do you develop the virtues of discipline and consistency? As I mentioned in yesterday’s thought of the day (Read More: Aug 24th: 2015 Thought of the Day) choose one positive thing you will add to your daily regiment and complete it without fail. I always recommend that you first introduce the habit of walking everyday because it has a plethora of benefits.

Be Happy and Chase your Dreams,

Pavan Mehat

PS Here are a couple of ways to connect with me if you have any questions or have any specific topics you would like me to address.

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August 23rd 2015: Thought of the Day

inspirational-quote-follow-your-heart

This pearl of wisdom above perfectly complements a recent thought of the day (Read More: Aug 21st: 2015 Thought of the Day). It is essential to pursue mastery of a task and attain excellence. Yet this journey must be traveled with the appropriate perspective.

We are all going to die. Our bodies will turn to  dust. Even the most venerable and accomplished humans will be forgotten. Therefore nothing in this world has absolute importance, just relative importance. 

This may seem like a depressing realization. On the contrary I would posit it is extremely liberating and energizing. Their is nothing that you can lose because the only things you have are: control of are your thoughts and actions. No one can take these from you. 

However, do not get me wrong this does not mean that you reject the world. You can still enjoy earthly pleasures. The key is to not get attached or personally identified with anything external. What matters is your character and actions. The ironic thing is the less you are personally identified with the results the better you do.

When have you performed your best in your sport?  I remember discussing this with my college coach, Robyne Johnson, and we both found it surprising that our best performances occurred when it felt like we were not trying. The jumps in which we “tried” really hard and thought were great ended up being mediocre. To perform your best you need to cultivate a detachment from the results, and intense focus on the present moment.

How do you cultivate this? Leverage the power of simplicity. For the vast majority people, they live in excess. Eat too much, sleep too much, and watch too much TV. The cravings for stimulation in excess of what our body truly needs is caused by our egos need to build itself up. The reason pain is associated with living the virtue of austerity is that people have become personally identified with all the material objects they posses.

Does you closet look this? How much of your clothes have you not worn in eons? Would you really miss them if they were gone?

Does you closet look this? How much of your clothes have you not worn in eons? Would you really miss them if they were gone?

Challenge yourself on a daily basis to strip away the unnecessary things you own. A great way to get started is to look in your closet.  How much of your closet contains clothes you have not worn in months or even years?

I came to this realization when I moved back home from Boston after finishing my undergrad. I did NOT realize how many clothes I had! I knew that I needed to donate a significant portion of my clothes.

While I was putting clothes away in the garbage bags to donate, I felt a tinge of pain. It felt as if I was losing a part of me. But then I allowed the pain to be there and became present. I realized the “pain” was an outgrowth of my ego that is always wanting more. They are plenty of people that are in dire need of clothes. I had plenty of clothes that were just collecting dust. It would be much better if someone else was able to wear them.

Once I was able to detach my sense of self from the clothes I owned, I felt absolutely liberated and thrilled. I was starting to break away the chains of slavery laid on me by  materialism and allow others to enjoy what I had no need for If you begin to make a conscious effort to simplify your life,  you will live a joy-filled life.

Be Happy and Chase your Dreams,

Pavan Mehat

PS Here are a couple of ways to connect with me if you have any questions or have any specific topics you would like me to address.

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How Contrast Therapy can keep you injury free and boost your health

This is how many elite athletes feel. I know I did while competing for BU. But are we really helping ourselves out following the maxim no pain no game. Absolutely not. A paradigm shift is needed in strength and conditioning.

This is how many elite athletes feel. I know I did while competing for BU. But are we really helping ourselves out by following the maxim no pain no gain. Absolutely not! A paradigm shift is needed in strength and conditioning.

Who are the only two people who are undefeated and will remain that way for the rest of eternity in sports? Father Time and Injuries. There is not much that we can do about Father Time. We are all getting older. However, we have much more control over injuries than we realize. No doubt collision injuries are impossible to avoid. However, non-contact injuries, like Derick Rose’s knee injury, should not occur when we have such supposedly “advanced” sports training. Derick Rose was all by himself and no one hit him or threw him off balance. I completely blame the stupidity of Tom Thibodeau and the Bull Training Staff for ruining his career.

There is no excuse for why D Rose suffered such a traumatic injury in a game with no contact. The major driving factor was most likely fatigue. The game was over, Tom Thibodeau should have had him out of the game.

There is no excuse for why D Rose suffered such a traumatic injury in a game with no contact. The major driving factor was most likely fatigue. The game was over, Tom Thibodeau should have taken him out of the game.

However, I digress. Unfortunately the vast majority of injuries that still occur today are 100% preventable. They are a plethora of aspects of sports training that go on today that are wrong and I will discuss them in future posts. However, the number one factor from my personal experience and experience from coaching many athletes that leads to preventable injury is fatigue. You might think we just need to reduce the workload placed on the athletes. In an ideal world this would work. However, sometimes it just can not be done.

The problem is under recovery.  As I mentioned in a previous post (Read More: Where do you get better at your sport?) you do NOT get better during your training but while you recover. Too many athletes think that once they leave the court pitch or gym that all their work is done. Their work is just beginning. Being the best athlete requires a 24/7 commitment to being the best that you can be because all facets of your life can dramatically effect your performance.

Who says that recovery can not be awe-inspiring and intensely pleasurable. My time at the Scandinave Spa was one of the most enjoyable experiences in my life.

Who says that recovery can not be awe-inspiring and intensely pleasurable. My time at the Scandinave Spa was one of the most enjoyable experiences in my life.

So what is a modality that you can use to drastically boost your recovery in a short time period? Contrast Therapy. It is used by many NBA, NHL, NFL, and Olympic athletes. It is quite simple. You alternate between bouts of hot and cold temperatures. This causes a drastic increase in circulation, which helps flush out toxins from your body, and reinvigorates the soul.

I was reminded of the power of contrast therapy last weekend. While on a family trip to Whistler, I got the wonderful opportunity to visit the Scandinave Spa. During my time at the spa I learned of an important  aspect I was neglecting from my contrast therapy routine. I was not having a relaxation period in between the bouts of hot and cold so my body could reach a state of homeostasis. The protocol they recommended was:

  1. 10-15 minutes to heat up your body (Jacuzzi, Hot Salt Bath, Sauna, or Steam Room)
  2. 30 seconds to 2 minutes of cold (Very Cold Shower or Ice Bath)
  3. 10-15 minutes of relaxation at room temperature to allow your body to reach homeostasis.
Not having access to a

Not having access to a “spa facilities” is no reason to not incorporate contrast therapy into your daily regiment.

But what if you do not have access to “fancy” spa facilities like a sauna or jacuzzi (although I would argue these are much more common now than people realize)? You can use a shower and get almost all the benefits. However, when in the shower the protocol changes slightly as you are unable to take a 10-15 minute break between bouts of hot and cold to reach homeostasis. What I recommend is:

  1. Spend 2 minutes in as hot as water as you can handle. If you have a stationary shower head, try to move around so that the water reaches all parts of your body. If you have a “moveable” head, you can direct the water to the areas that are in most need of repair.
  2. Then as quickly as possible switch to as cold as you can handle. Remain under the cold water for at least one minute, and repeat as many times as desired. I recommend you repeat this sequence at least twice and no more than five times.

Contrast therapy will make you feel instantly better after a grueling workout. However, its not only enhances recovery but also your health as well. Its great for the circulatory system, and flushing out toxins from your lymph system. On top of that it invigorates the soul, as the shock of switching between temperatures makes you feel alive and will make you feel joyous.

Be Happy and Chase your Dreams,

Pavan Mehat

PS Here are a couple of ways to connect with me if you have any questions or have any specific topics you would like me to address.

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Sensory Deprivation (Isolation) Tanks: My Experience

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What is a sensory deprivation or isolation tank?

A sensory deprivation tank uses ~ 900lbs of Epsom salt that allows you to float. The temperature of the water is set to your skin temperature ~ 93.5 °F. The result is that you lose awareness of your body.

This novel sensation accompanied with no light or auditory stimulus is extremely beneficial for your body. It helps to reduce the overactive stress response, induce a relaxation response, and decrease chronic pain. Also, the Epsom salt is therapeutic because your body is able to soak up the magnesium. A mineral, which is essential for your well being, but which the majority of the population is deficient in. For a more detailed description about the purported health benefits of isolation tanks, check out this great article from Men’s Journal.

I first heard about sensory deprivation through a mutual friend. However at first, I thought it was a load of B.S. But once I begin exploring it, I became fascinated. Then I was watching the Joe Rogan video below, and I knew I had to try it out ASAP.

My experience

My first experience with the tranquility pod was at West Coast Float . As soon as I entered the building, I knew this would be a wonderful experience. It was so calm and soothing. I was then ushered into my own personal room, where everything was laid out for me. We were then instructed how the tranquility pod worked, and to shower, dry off and enter pod.

I then entered the pod. I put my foot in, and it seemed to be exactly like regular water. I wondered if I had made a mistake Then I placed my entire body in and then by some “magic” I was floating! It was as if my body had disappeared. I still knew intellectually that I had a body, but unless I drifted against the sides of the pods I could not sense my body.

In the pods I had the option to close the door or not, and keep the lights on or not. I decided to fully immerse myself in the experience by closing the door and keeping the lights off.

It is remarkable the myriad of things that we are completely oblivious to because we get so caught up in the external world. As soon as I started floating, I noticed a lot of tension all over my body. I was shocked about how much unnecessary tension I was holding in my muscles. I pride myself on my body awareness, since I have been consistently practicing tai chi, qi gong, and yoga for a while. However, I clearly have a long ways to go.

It is not just in science fiction or the movies where one can enter a tranquility pond. You can try one out right now!

It is not just in science fiction or the movies where one can enter a tranquility pond. You can try one out right now!

I did not only learn more about my physical state, but also some hidden emotions. A few times, it seemed randomly, I would get a burst of fear where my heart would race, and I felt I needed to open the pod ASAP! At first I thought maybe the air was not circulating well enough. Upon reflection, I realized that this “fear” is an undercurrent in my daily life that manifests itself in subtle ways during the day that prevents me from being the best that I can be. When I was completely derived from external stimuli, there was no external circumstance my brain could use to rationalize this fear. Therefore it came out full throttle. But this was very therapeutic because I realized that the fear was unfounded, and just an outgrowth of my overactive mind.

Despite some minor unpleasant sensations, it was a wonderful experience. After the first 5-15 minutes the vast majority of my negative emotions subsided and I felt a peace and bliss I have never experienced before. This is something I would recommend everyone try at least once in their life. Also for those who are a tad narcissistic, my skin was glowing when I left and my hair looked so much healthier.

Could sensory deprivation or isolation tanks be used to improve athletic performance?

Yes! It is already used by NFL, NHL, NBA, and Olympic athletes to improve their mental concentration, induce a state of deep relaxation,and provide them a distraction free environment to visualize.

As one moves up the ranks in athletics, the physical aspect becomes less and less important because the talent discrepancy becomes smaller and smaller. Once at the world class stage, such as the Olympics, physically the athletes are almost identical. What separates them is their mental fortitude and belief in their ability that allows them to perform under pressure.

Pressure can cripple even the most physically perfect athlete because if they begin to think while they are competing they are bound to lose. For example in Tennis if you watch the pros warm-up, they are hitting perfect serves easily and effortlessly. Then how come during the match, they are many times in which they do no execute on their serves? They lose their concentration on the task at hand because of the pressure and distractions. The use of a tranquility pod is a wonderful way to develop your concentration, and learn to relax. This will carry itself over while you are playing your sport, which will allow you to express all of your potential.

Be Happy and Chase your Dreams,

Pavan Mehat

PS Here are a couple of ways to connect with me if you have any questions or have any specific topics you would like me to address.

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August 12th 2015: Thought of the Day

“The darkest hour is just before the dawn” – Unknown

This morning I was able to lead the morning walking group for the Running Room through the beautiful Pacific Spirit Park. It gave me some much needed time away from distractions to contemplate. I was reflecting on how I was feeling discouraged by the rut I have been in recently.

Sometimes it feels as if their is no end to your struggle. Just keep pushing your great breakthrough is just around the corner.

Sometimes it feels as if their is no end to your struggle. Just keep pushing your great breakthrough is just around the corner.

Then the quote above popped into my head. Is it just a nice platitude? When I reflected on previous times in my life I realized that my greatest breakthroughs followed my greatest struggles.

One example of this was during my junior track season at Boston University. I had been struggling the last two weeks during jumps practice and my body felt banged up after a long indoor season. We had one more meet left to qualify for New England’s and IC4A’s. This was make it or break it for me.

While I was warming up, my body felt very stiff and sore. I was worried. It did not go away during the warm-up. However, once I stepped on the runway I entered the “zone”. I completed my jump, and heard the official report my mark: “14.05 meters.” A personal best!

I was astonished I had jumped so far because the jump had felt effortless. It was if someone else was moving my body. But then I started to wonder why did all my learning follow this trend?

It is based on the neuroscience. For any skill, as long as you have the baseline physical capacity to complete it, learning is limited by your brain’s processing capacity. Learning can be simplified into four stages:

  1. Unconscious uncompetence
  2. Conscious uncompotence
  3. Conscious compotence
  4. Unconscious competence

When you begin learning anything, you will see dramatic improvement as you move from stages 1 to 3. However, suddenly all your progress stops. Does that mean you should give up? Absolutely not! What is happening is that your brain is laying down and strengthening the neural networks that will allow you to move from stage 3 to stage 4. This is what results in the dramatic improvement in performance. To be great in any field it requires unconscious competence. So do not get discouraged by plateaus; just realize that your brain is laying down the foundation to allow your performance to take a quantum leap.

When Michael would be soaring for dunks I can guarantee that he was not consciously contemplating how to dunk the basketball.

When Michael would be soaring for dunks I can guarantee that he was not consciously contemplating how to dunk the basketball.

Be Happy and Chase your Dreams,

Pavan Mehat

PS Here are a couple of ways to connect with me if you have any questions or have any specific topics you would like me to address.

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May 30th 2015: Thought of the Day

So I am always interested in studying and analyzing what makes people great and supposedly Kobe Bryant is as well! I was reading this amazing article in the Boston Globe about an interview with Arianna Huffington and Kobe Bryant. It is filled with gems so if you have time I would definitely go check it out. However, the line below really resonated with me as I have been a tad nervous this morning as I have a track meet later today.

Interviewer: So being great in the clutch means knowing there’s a moment after the clutch?

Kobe Bryant: There’s an infinite groove. Whether you make the shot or miss it is inconsequential.

It may seem strange for Kobe and Arianna Huffington to be having lunch together, but as Kobe says:

It may seem strange for Kobe and Arianna Huffington to be having lunch together, but as Kobe says: “No matter what industry you look at, people who do phenomenal things, there’s a common thread to them. I’ve always been curious about that, as a way to become a better basketball player.”

Wow! I would have never expected the Black Mamba to say whether you miss a shot or not is inconsequential. However, that is exactly the reason he is able to play with such fearless abandon.

He obviously has a huge desire to win, but he has NOT become personally attached or identified with his on-court performance. He understands the super important lesson that what he does is NOT who he is.

Until you are able to do so you will never reach your full potential because your distorted sense of the true importance of any one particular event will cause you to hesitate or have fears and anxieties fester which will strip you of your focus.

It is obviously easier said than done to not personally identify with what you do, but it is something that must be cultivated. This again is a soft skill that can not be easily acquired. However, some specific ways I like to strengthen this skill are:

  1. Change the language you use to describe what you do –The phrase, “I am an athlete” implicitly mistakes what you do for who you are. A better way is to say, “I compete in athletics.” It is something you do but NOT something you are.
  2. Reflect on your past – It is always easy to lose perspective in the heat of the moment. A great way to combat this is to think of something that you thought may have had a huge impact on your life in the distant past, and realize how inconsequential the result of that event was. For example, in the moment when I gut cut from BU’s basketball team I felt like the world was crumbling. However, it is something that in the big picture has been inconsequential.
  3. Cultivate an enjoyment of the process – Do NOT measure your progress based on the results but whether or not you are taking action that is moving you towards your dream.
  4. Meditate – This is something I have been harping on over and over again, but there is such an overwhelming amount of evidence and it is a constant theme behind excellence performance that you can NOT afford to not meditate.

Be Happy and Chase your Dreams,

Pavan Mehat

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PS Here are a few ways to connect with me if you have any questions or have any specific topics you would like me to address. 

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May 28th 2015: Thought of the Day

most-people-say-that-is-it-is-the-intellect-which-makes-a-great-scientist-they-are-wrong-it-is-characterThis quote was presented to me in an ethics class I recently finished up at UBC. Even though all my peers and myself were moaning about the class it was surprisingly interesting and deeply concerning at the same time. It is always thought of as academia being where the “pure unbiased” science occurs. But we went through example after example in which research scientist succumbed to the pressure of “publish or perish” and just outright stole or fabricated scientific data for the sole purpose of advancing their career. In addition, their results usually had extremely detrimental effects on patient’s lives, even possibly causing the death of countless of people (for example with all the nonsense about relationship between vaccines and autism)

So it made complete sense that this quote from arguably the greatest scientist came up in class. However, unlike my professor I do not think he was solely discussing about moral behavior but just about who you are as a person.

This quote instantly reminded me of a time before a meet in which Sam and I would both go on to break our personal records for the high jump and triple jump respectively. We both mentioned how great we felt physically, but also how relaxed we felt because of a certain sense of detachment. We did NOT need the amazing result during the competition to validate us. Going out and performing better than we had ever done before did NOT make us better athletes. It was just the outward manifestation of the inner transformation we have made.

So, what Einstein is really trying to point towards is that its the inner reality that is the most important, and then what happens in the external reality logically follows based on the person you have become.

Be Happy and Chase your Dreams,

Pavan Mehat

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PS Here are a few ways to connect with me if you have any questions or have any specific topics you would like me to address. 

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May 26th 2015: Thought of the Day

success-isnt-something-you-chase-its-something-you-have-to-put-forth-the-effort-for-constantly-then-maybe-itll-come-when-you-least-expect-it-michael-jordan

This is one of my favourite quotes from Michael Jordan (which I have to admit is basically all of them) but it was playing in a basketball game against at my high school against an Elite Basketball School from Denmark yesterday that made me instantly think of this quote.

Throughout high school I was obsessed about being known as an amazing basketball player, that would go on to be the star for an NCAA division IVY League basketball team. I was no way a selfish player or a prima dona. First and foremost I wanted our team to win championships. However, I also wanted all the accolades, and attention to come along with it. I wanted my cake and to eat it too.

However, the harder I tried to “be successful” and fulfill myself through my accomplishments the more they seemed to slip away through my fingers. Not to mention it was the least enjoyable time of my life. Even though I had achieved substantial success, I was inordinately self-conscious and anxious because I had based my entire self-concept on my basketball skills and ability. If I had a great game if I felt on top of the world, but when I played bad I felt worthless.

This whole process continued on throughout my basketball career until the fateful day in which I was cut from Boston University’s Men’s Basketball Team. It was absolutely heart-breaking. I felt like who I was had died. I walked around campus like a ghost. I was feeling a mixture of intense sadness and anger (the video below encapsulates my feelings at that time well). I could not understand how I could fail even though I worked so hard and it wanted it so bad. However, that is exactly why I failed.

I wanted it too bad, and I was constantly ignoring the beauty of the present moment (which is life itself!) and projecting myself forward to a future point in time in which I would inhabit a perfect stress free world because I was a NCAA division 1 basketball player. It is comical what I used to think as a teenager.

After I got cut I felt so embarrassed that I essentially removed myself from almost every connection with the basketball community I had (which were numerous) and stopped playing basketball (which is what I love to do the most). However, after years the orange round ball kept calling me back and I couldn’t resist.

The game yesterday perfectly encapsulates the quote above. Even though I was super sore from a very hard track workout I had done the day before, I was throwing down the classic one hand Lebron-esque dunk. I love that dunk because you can really crank it back hard and slam it hard. The crowd loved it. This was something that always eluded me back in my high school days. I got to the game and things just flowed effortlessly. It was like I was watching a movie. I knew what to do but it was as if something was flowing through me and executing the movements effortlessly.

How I felt in warm-ups.

How I felt in warm-ups.

In addition, yesterday may have been one of the most enjoyable times I have had while playing basketball. I had absolutely zero expectation about my performance. I was not out there to prove something to someone. I was just so happy to be able to play once again with my high school teammates. Obviously I have worked extremely hard over the years to prepare my body, but the primary reason for my success is my ability to live in the moment and embrace the current moment no matter what shape it may take. I used to always scowl at the refs when they called a foul on me, and now I was just joking around with them.

As mentioned in a previous post (Read More: Mindfulness in Motion) this state of intense presence is the most important aspect of excellence in any field. But how do you develop the mental tools to remain in this moment? I am sure you can guess what I am going to say, but yes it is meditation!

I just want to clear one common misconception right off the bat. Meditation does not require you becoming a celibate monk, leaving your current life and going to a monastery where you sit in the lotus position for hours on end. Meditation, is simply the act of focusing your attention completely on something here and now. They are countless ways to do this, and in an upcoming free e-book I will guide you on the best way to foray into the vast field of meditation.

Although I am sure this is an extremely effective way to meditate, you by no means have to do it in this way.

Although I am sure this is an extremely effective way to meditate, you by no means have to do it in this way.

Be Happy and Chase your Dreams,

Pavan Mehat

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Using Douglas Heel’s “Be-Activated” Part II – Sequencing: Theory and Illustration

Heel’s system is designed to uncover compensation patterns in the body.  It revolves around posture, breathing and muscle recruitment, which all go hand-in-hand.  Every movement must start in the center of the body and move outwards, effectively expanding the body, instead of starting at a distal (far from the center) area and moving inwards, which causes a collapse in the body.  Heel divides the body into zones, pictured below.  1-2-3 is the ideal muscle sequencing pattern, anything else is a liability for injury or subpar performance.

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Zone 1: The Diaphragm, Psoas and Glutes:

Hip flexion and extension is the body’s primary priority – it cannot move without it. The psoas and glutes are designed to flex and extend the hip – they are in the best position to do so. The psoas will not be working properly if the diaphragm is not working properly, because the fascia encasing the diaphragm also wraps around the psoas.  If breathing is compromised, due to stress or bad posture, the functioning of the entire body will also be compromised.  If the glute/psoas can’t do their job correctly, another set of muscles will take over in order to move. I say “set” because no single muscle can do the job of either glute or psoas.

The diaphragm is involved because the fascia holding it in place connects to the psoas.  If the diaphragm shuts down due to stress, poor posture or other reasons the psoas cannot do its job.  Due to reciprocal inhibition, the glutes cannot fire if the psoas cannot fire. If the glutes cannot fire, the hamstring will do its own job AND take over for the glutes.  Because these muscles are supposed to fire first in any movement, if you can’t breathe deeply into your belly, you won’t sequence properly.

Sequencing should be 1-2-3. However, most athletes are firing zones two or three first – this means that they fire their quad and abdominals together to make up for a misfiring psoas (leaving those muscles unable to effectively do their own jobs) or firing their shin or even hand muscles first. I was surprised to see how many athletes cannot get their brain to fire a hip flexor without tensioning the ankle joint first – these athletes may have shin splints, Achilles problems, chronically tight calves or any other disfunction stemming from the way they compensate when their feet hit the ground.  The predictive value of an athlete’s sequencing pattern has been pretty on point in my limited experience testing this in my athletes.

What does a 1-2-3 look like in action? Here is Irving Saladino, Olympic long jump champion from Panama. In this picture, notice the lack of tension immediately after takeoff – you can see it in this slow motion video as well, fingers lightly curled, jaw lightly closed, toe mildly up, but there is no excessive tension in these areas when he raises his free leg upon takeoff. His psoas muscle is able to do its own job, the hands and face (which cannot add anything to the jump) are able to relax because they are not called upon to work. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbLZKY2CRk4)

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What does a malfunctioning pattern look like? Here I am, in two separate pictures. My pattern on the right is a 3-3-3 arm – this means that in order to flex my right hip, my brain sends tension to my left hand first. My psoas on that side cannot do its own job, so the brain tries to add tension in other areas to assist in hip flexion. This is why I make a strange claw with it as I jump. This need-for-tension in my hand explains how I could hit my head on the rim, but could not get anywhere near that high with a basketball in my hand – holding a ball forces my hand to open, and as a result, my brain cuts the amount of power it gives to my hip drive. This is a setup for injury as well, because my strength levels drop when I cannot/do not close my left hand. It also explains why I have injured my left thumb so often – my hand thinks it has to do hip flexion, so when it has to do its own job it is tired or out of position. My face is also holding a ton of tension, which is only hindering my ability to jump far.  My mind-body connection had blown a fuse, it didn’t know which muscle to fire when.  While I had some success this season, I also missed almost all of it because of injury.

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The way we get it working again is first by working with the breath – if the diaphragm isn’t working nothing will work properly – and rubbing neurolymphatic reflex points that cause our brain to wake up muscles that it has stopped using, whether because of stress, bad movement patterns, or other reasons. The result is that there is a measurable difference in performance in controlled tests. That difference can be flexibility or strength, depending on the area. The pre/post test differences are often shocking – 45* to 90* range of motion in the hamstring, two fingers pushing down a raised knee to my full bodyweight on said knee. It can resolve pain and optimize performance. It’s pretty cool.